Mark 14

Sunday Service

Worship Gathering: 10 am

by: Pastor Michael Bartlett

04/07/2022

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Before we read Mark 14 and today's devotional, I want to remind us that this Sunday at 10am we will sit at tables and have a Seder Meal (symbolic presentation of the Passover Meal.) Come early and get a table for you, your friends and your whole family.  Your plate will be like a Jewish luncheable and we will describe what each item is and how it ALL points to JESUS as our spotless LAMB!  
 
We have some larger tables set out for larger families so sit accordingly.  Our CARE team and other leaders will be available to help you.  You don't want to miss and bring someone with you!  We will finish with communion...it's going to be special!
 
Read Mark 14 and below are some thoughts from David Guzik:
 
 
Mark 14 – Jesus’ Betrayal, Arrest, and Trial
A. Preparations for death.
1. (1-2) The rulers resolve to kill Jesus.
After two days it was the Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread. And the chief priests and the scribes sought how they might take Him by trickery and put Him to death. But they said, “Not during the feast, lest there be an uproar of the people.”
a. After two days it was the Passover: The time is significant, because there was at Passover not only a great expectation of the Messiah, but Jerusalem was also crowded with these Messiah-expecting multitudes. Since Passover remembered the time when God raised up a great deliverer and freed Israel from foreign oppression, it was a time of great patriotic and messianic anticipation. The Romans were on guard and ready for any hint of revolt.
i. Every possible preparation was made for the Passover. For a month ahead of time, the meaning of Passover was explained in each synagogue and Jewish school so that no one was unprepared. As pilgrims streamed into Jerusalem, they noticed that every tomb near a road was painted with fresh whitewash, to prevent them from defiling themselves accidentally by brushing against a tomb.
ii. Every male Jew who lived within 15 miles of Jerusalem had to come to Jerusalem for Passover. Many more came from great distances – including Galilee. Many people who heard and saw Jesus in the region of Galilee were here, with great respect and great expectation regarding Jesus.
iii. The feasts of Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread were held one after the other. “In popular usage the two festivals were merged and treated for practical purposes as the seven-day ‘feast of the Passover.’” (Lane)
b. How they might take Him by trickery: As the chief priests and the scribes plotted the murder of an innocent man, it showed that they did not fear God. Nevertheless, they feared the people (lest there be an uproar of the people). These religious leaders were not afraid to murder the Son of God; they just believed they had to do it in a politically smart way.
c. Not during the feast: The religious leaders did not want to kill Jesus during the Passover feast, but they ended up doing it during that time anyway. This clearly shows that Jesus was in command and though the leaders acted according to the evil inclination of their hearts, their actions fulfilled prophecy and the plan of Jesus.
i. From John 11:57 it seems that the religious leaders originally intended to seize Jesus during the feast. When they saw the popularity of Jesus at the triumphal entry and His authority on the temple mount, they changed their minds and decided to do it after the feast. Their plan changed again when Judas volunteered to arrange a private, quiet arrest.
 
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Before we read Mark 14 and today's devotional, I want to remind us that this Sunday at 10am we will sit at tables and have a Seder Meal (symbolic presentation of the Passover Meal.) Come early and get a table for you, your friends and your whole family.  Your plate will be like a Jewish luncheable and we will describe what each item is and how it ALL points to JESUS as our spotless LAMB!  
 
We have some larger tables set out for larger families so sit accordingly.  Our CARE team and other leaders will be available to help you.  You don't want to miss and bring someone with you!  We will finish with communion...it's going to be special!
 
Read Mark 14 and below are some thoughts from David Guzik:
 
 
Mark 14 – Jesus’ Betrayal, Arrest, and Trial
A. Preparations for death.
1. (1-2) The rulers resolve to kill Jesus.
After two days it was the Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread. And the chief priests and the scribes sought how they might take Him by trickery and put Him to death. But they said, “Not during the feast, lest there be an uproar of the people.”
a. After two days it was the Passover: The time is significant, because there was at Passover not only a great expectation of the Messiah, but Jerusalem was also crowded with these Messiah-expecting multitudes. Since Passover remembered the time when God raised up a great deliverer and freed Israel from foreign oppression, it was a time of great patriotic and messianic anticipation. The Romans were on guard and ready for any hint of revolt.
i. Every possible preparation was made for the Passover. For a month ahead of time, the meaning of Passover was explained in each synagogue and Jewish school so that no one was unprepared. As pilgrims streamed into Jerusalem, they noticed that every tomb near a road was painted with fresh whitewash, to prevent them from defiling themselves accidentally by brushing against a tomb.
ii. Every male Jew who lived within 15 miles of Jerusalem had to come to Jerusalem for Passover. Many more came from great distances – including Galilee. Many people who heard and saw Jesus in the region of Galilee were here, with great respect and great expectation regarding Jesus.
iii. The feasts of Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread were held one after the other. “In popular usage the two festivals were merged and treated for practical purposes as the seven-day ‘feast of the Passover.’” (Lane)
b. How they might take Him by trickery: As the chief priests and the scribes plotted the murder of an innocent man, it showed that they did not fear God. Nevertheless, they feared the people (lest there be an uproar of the people). These religious leaders were not afraid to murder the Son of God; they just believed they had to do it in a politically smart way.
c. Not during the feast: The religious leaders did not want to kill Jesus during the Passover feast, but they ended up doing it during that time anyway. This clearly shows that Jesus was in command and though the leaders acted according to the evil inclination of their hearts, their actions fulfilled prophecy and the plan of Jesus.
i. From John 11:57 it seems that the religious leaders originally intended to seize Jesus during the feast. When they saw the popularity of Jesus at the triumphal entry and His authority on the temple mount, they changed their minds and decided to do it after the feast. Their plan changed again when Judas volunteered to arrange a private, quiet arrest.
 
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